William C. Bell

Health Policy & Management, Institute for Disaster Management
Senior Research Scientist Emeritus

Health Policy & Management, Institute for Disaster Management

  • Education

    PhD, University of Edinburgh, 1974

    M.A. (Hons), University of Edinburgh, Scotland, 1966

  • Areas of Expertise

    Research:  disaster modeling, CBRNE modeling, complex emergencies, nuclear modeling, emergency management, geographical information systems, current civil wars, humanitarian assistance

    Teaching: disaster management, international agency response, complex emergencies in war torn countries, hazard prediction and assessment, modeling of CBRNE events

     

     

  • Course Instruction

    Lectures series on International Disasters, especially on the roles of the various International Agencies in disaster response and the integration of decision support data from field to senior decision makers in head offices such as UN Agencies in Geneva and Rome and USAID in Washington,

    Lecture series on CBRNE modeling with programs such as HPAC to look at consequence assessment for disasters. Students actively participate individually on computers in a laboratory environment modeling chemical transportation accidents and chemical and nuclear terrorist events

    Dr. Bell uses modeling of real life disasters and disaster scenarios as a means to educate Public Health students on the scale and human consequences of a wide range of past and potential disasters on healthcare. He also explore the integration of data from the field to head offices for complex emergencies, especially during civil wars, using past emerging country examples he has been actively involved in. These include several Central American and West African countries, Colombia, Egypt, Yemen, the Republics of Sudan and South Sudan.

     

  • Research Interests

    Dr. Bell’s research has focused on the field of disaster management and consequence assessment especially as related to high risk Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive Events (CBRNE). His current work simulates sub-continental nuclear wars, their health effects on exposed populations and the impact on health care delivery post-war.